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2011 Ohio GIS Conference Abstracts and Bios

 

2011 Ohio GIS Conference

September 29-30, 2011

Thursday 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Workshop: Maximizing the Remote Sensing Advantage for Local Government Applications
This workshop, sponsored by the OhioView Consortium, introduces emerging techniques and applications available to extend the usefulness of remotely sensed imagery beyond traditional land cover mapping applications.

Kevin Czajkowski - University of Toledo
Kevin Czajkowski is a Professor at the University of Toledo in the Department of Geography and Planning. His research interests include the use of GIS and remote sensing to study the influence of agricultural land on water quality.

Pete Clapham - Cleveland State University
Pete Clapham is Professor in the Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences at Cleveland State University. He has done research into urbanization in northeastern Ohio and vegetation mapping in the Colorado River Valley of Arizona and California. He teaches scientific and environmental applications of GIS and Remote Sensing at the undergraduate and graduate levels at Cleveland State.

James Lein - Ohio University
James Lein is a Professor of Geography at Ohio University. His research concentrates in the areas of Environmental GIScience and the application of remote sensing in resource management, environmental assessment and hazard analysis.

Robert Vincent - Bowling Green State University
Robert Vincent is a Professor of Geology at Bowling Green State University. His research and teaching centers on geological and environmental remote-sensing as well as solid earth geophysics

Thursday 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Workshop: Lidar for Science
This workshop will be an overview of National Elevation Dataset (NED), USGS Center for LIDAR Information Coordination and Knowledge (CLICK), lidar processing, the USGS lidar specification, and lidar research activities being pursued at the USGS EROS Data Center. Status, requirements and access to the USGS high resolution elevation data will be discussed with an emphasis on data anomolies, hydro-flattening, natural coastal water and other current data issues.

Gayla Evans - USGS-EROS
Gayla Evans is a Geographer working with the U.S. Geological Survey at the Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, Sioux Falls, SD. Gayla has spent the last 26 years developing expertise in lidar elevation modeling, vector and reaster image processing, and project management. Presently, she is task lead for the National Elevation Data (NED) and responsible for daily operations, status, and future innovations of this multi-resolution elevation dataset at the center.

Thursday 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 3, Franklin Room C
Workshop: Opening your GIS to Data Input from Web and Mobile Users
Allowing web and mobile users to contribute to your GIS removes the traditional bottle necks involved in updating spatial data. However, simply enabling access does not mean you will effectively leverage these resources. This workshop will focus on best practices for allowing data input through the web and mobile devices. We will start by focusing on implementing common web templates for enabling constituent engagement. Then we will focus on mobile solutions. We will discuss consumer mobile solutions like iOS, Android and Windows Phone 7. We will also discuss professional GIS data collection using ArcGIS Mobile and ArcPad and we will discuss the main issues involved in deciding on the best mobile solution for a given application. We will demonstrate how to enable data collection for ArcGIS Mobile, Android, iOS and Windows Phone 7.

This workshop will include a hands-on portion in the afternoon. If you bring an iOS, Windows Phone 7, or an ArcGIS Mobile supported device there will be an opportunity to build an application for your device and try out the technology for yourself. Here is a list of supported devices:
http://resources.arcgis.com/content/arcgis-mobile/10.0/system-requirements

Tom  Brenneman - Esri
Tom Brenneman joined ESRI as an instructor in 1996. He advanced to increasingly more responsible positions and now a solution engineer in Esri's Indianapolis, Indiana, project office. There his responsibilities include technical sales support, and consulting support for new and ongoing projects. He has more than fifteen years of experience working with GIS applications and specializes in enterprise GIS implementations. He earned a B.S. in environmental science from the University of Redlands in California in 1996.

Thursday 8:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Workshop: VRS for GIS
An introduction to Ohio's Virtual Reference System (VRS) for GIS data collection.

Scott Hawkins - ODOT
Scott holds a Bachelor's Degree in surveying from the University of Akron and is a Professional Surveyor in the State of Ohio. Scott currently works for the Ohio Department of Transportation's Office of Aerial Engineering.

Dave Beiter - ODOT
Dave holds a Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from Ohio University and is a Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio. Dave currently works for the Ohio Department of Transportation's Office of Aerial Engineering and coordinates the VRS and CORS network.

Thursday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Workshop: Maximizing the Remote Sensing Advantage for Local Government Applications
This workshop, sponsored by the OhioView Consortium, introduces emerging techniques and applications available to extend the usefulness of remotely sensed imagery beyond traditional land cover mapping applications.

Kevin Czajkowski - University of Toledo
Kevin Czajkowski is a Professor at the University of Toledo in the Department of Geography and Planning. His research interests include the use of GIS and remote sensing to study the influence of agricultural land on water quality.

Pete Clapham - Cleveland State University
Pete Clapham is Professor in the Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences at Cleveland State University. He has done research into urbanization in northeastern Ohio and vegetation mapping in the Colorado River Valley of Arizona and California. He teaches scientific and environmental applications of GIS and Remote Sensing at the undergraduate and graduate levels at Cleveland State.

James Lein - Ohio University
James Lein is a Professor of Geography at Ohio University. His research concentrates in the areas of Environmental GIScience and the application of remote sensing in resource management, environmental assessment and hazard analysis.

Robert Vincent - Bowling Green State University
Robert Vincent is a Professor of Geology at Bowling Green State University. His research and teaching centers on geological and environmental remote-sensing as well as solid earth geophysics

Thursday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Workshop: Geocaching Fun for Everyone
Geocaching has become a grown-up treasure hunt. Besides fun, it can be a useful marketing tool to generate continued activity within your jurisdiction. This workshop focuses on the basics of geocaching and how to develop geocaching targets that can help treasure seekers learn a little more about your jurisdictions history, hidden jewels within your jurisdiction, lure them to fun activities, or marketplace guidance.

Doug Kotnik - Precision Laser and Instrument
Doug Kotnik, GISP - Precision Laser & Instrument 20 years GIS experience in private sector, consulting, and government. Formerly Butler County GIS Director and 2007 OGRIP Best Practice Award recipient. Currently in charge of MGIS/GPS sales in Ohio for Precision Laser and Instrument.

Ken Carrier - Montgomery County Water Service
Ken Carrier - GIS Specialist-Montgomery County Water Services. 6 years GIS experiences in government sector, 2007 OGRIP Best Practice Award recipient, 2010 ESRI SAG Award recipient. One of the founding members of SWOGIS (Southwest Ohio GIS Users Group).

Patricia Moehring - City of Lebanon
GIS Administrator -- City of Lebanon --12 years local government GIS experience. Actively involved with non-profit organizations to promote GIS and Geography awareness -- OGRIP (11 years), Ohio URISA (6 years), and Caching Our World K-12 Geography Education (5 years).

Robbyn Abbitt - Miami University
GIS Coordinator/GISci Certificate Advisor - Miami University. 13 years GIS experience working for universities and non-profit organizations.

Thursday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track 3, Franklin Room C
Workshop: Opening your GIS to Data Input from Web and Mobile Users
Allowing web and mobile users to contribute to your GIS removes the traditional bottle necks involved in updating spatial data. However, simply enabling access does not mean you will effectively leverage these resources. This workshop will focus on best practices for allowing data input through the web and mobile devices. We will start by focusing on implementing common web templates for enabling constituent engagement. Then we will focus on mobile solutions. We will discuss consumer mobile solutions like iOS, Android and Windows Phone 7. We will also discuss professional GIS data collection using ArcGIS Mobile and ArcPad and we will discuss the main issues involved in deciding on the best mobile solution for a given application. We will demonstrate how to enable data collection for ArcGIS Mobile, Android, iOS and Windows Phone 7.

This workshop will include a hands-on portion in the afternoon. If you bring an iOS, Windows Phone 7, or an ArcGIS Mobile supported device there will be an opportunity to build an application for your device and try out the technology for yourself. Here is a list of supported devices:
http://resources.arcgis.com/content/arcgis-mobile/10.0/system-requirements

Tom  Brenneman - Esri
Tom Brenneman joined ESRI as an instructor in 1996. He advanced to increasingly more responsible positions and now a solution engineer in Esri's Indianapolis, Indiana, project office. There his responsibilities include technical sales support, and consulting support for new and ongoing projects. He has more than fifteen years of experience working with GIS applications and specializes in enterprise GIS implementations. He earned a B.S. in environmental science from the University of Redlands in California in 1996.

Thursday 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Workshop: VRS for GIS
An introduction to Ohio's Virtual Reference System (VRS) for GIS data collection.

Scott Hawkins - ODOT
Scott holds a Bachelor's Degree in surveying from the University of Akron and is a Professional Surveyor in the State of Ohio. Scott currently works for the Ohio Department of Transportation's Office of Aerial Engineering.

Dave Beiter - ODOT
Dave holds a Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from Ohio University and is a Professional Engineer in the State of Ohio. Dave currently works for the Ohio Department of Transportation's Office of Aerial Engineering and coordinates the VRS and CORS network.

Friday 8:20 am - 8:50 am
Track 1, Franklin Room A
An overview of Coordinate systems and vertical datum’s and how to trouble shoot issues that arise when using new data.
One of the biggest struggles when dealing with spatial data is making sure that all data layers line up correctly. We have all received a new data file, loaded it into our mapping software only to see it show up miles from where we know it should be, or more dangerously it is only slightly shifted from other layers. It is frustrating trying to track down the spatial metadata information and even more so when it is incorrect. In a perfect world all data would line up on the first try, and we would not have to expend the time and effort to line up all the layers required to answer the question at hand. A person that is new to overlaying multiple spatial data sets will be overwhelmed by the list of possible datum’s and coordinate systems. Luckily there are some simple procedures and tests that can be used to avoid problems further down the line. Since we do not live in a perfect world pre-planning is the key to assuring that everything falls correctly into place.

In this presentation we will go over the basics introducing various coordinate systems and datum’s that are most commonly used in Ohio. We will give you the knowledge necessary to successfully line up all of your spatial data, and some very important questions to ask when you receive, or request new data. This will allow you to successfully pull in those pesky outliers and eliminate the time consuming headaches caused by undefined data.


Mark Seidelmann - Stantec
Mark Seidelmann is a Senior Project Engineer in the Columbus, Ohio office of Stantec Consulting Services Inc. Mark received a Bachelors and Masters degree from The Ohio State University in Civil Engineering with a focus on Remote Sensing. Over the past five years Mark has been involved in all aspects of FEMA’s Map Modernization project from scoping, hydrology and hydraulics to floodplain mapping and DFIRM production.

Erick Lobao - Stantec
Erick Lobao earned a B.A. in Geography and Environmental Studies from Ohio Wesleyan University and a Master in Geography from The Ohio State University. He has a wide range of experience utilizing GIS to facilitate data management and spatial analysis in both the private and public sectors. His previous work and educational experience provide a background that is well rounded in essential GIS skills such as data creation, data transformation, projections, cartography, visualization, statistical analysis and GPS data collection. He is equally comfortable and familiar working with environmental data sets, such as watersheds and floodplains as well as urban infrastructure, such as street centerlines and parcel polygons. As a GIS Project Manager in the Columbus office, Mr. Lobao addresses the GIS needs of Stantec clients and staff, effectively communicating the capabilities of GIS to individuals with varying amounts of experience in GIS.

Friday 8:20 am - 8:50 am
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Hopping On the RIA Train – Solon’s Flex API Web Applications
The City of Solon has been using GIS services in-house since the late 1990’s. In 2005 the city launched its first public website using ArcIMS. In February 2011 the city replaced the ArcIMS site with a Flex API application using ArcGIS Server. We now utilize a duel ArcGIS Server deployment both on our internal network and in the cloud. Today Solon GIS helps to serve the needs of many different city departments and its citizens.
This presentation will show the progression of GIS in Solon with a focus on our recent cloud deployment of ArcGIS Viewer for Flex using ArcGIS Server on Amazon EC2.


Tim Howard - City of Solon
Tim has over 10 years of experience working with GIS in local government. He has been with the City of Solon for over 8 years. Tim started "playing" with the ArcGIS API for Flex when it was first released back in 2008. He holds a BA in Geography with a Minor in Cartography from Kent State University.

Friday 8:20 am - 8:50 am
Track 3, Franklin Room C
OSIP - More Than Meets The Eye
With OSIP, a new statewide collection of color ortho-imagery will be created over the next four years (2011-2014). Although aesthetically pleasing, this new ortho-imagery also provides additional benefits to the citizens of Ohio. With the implementation of remote sensing technologies, the new ortho-imagery provides a strong base for which the extraction of ground features (i.e. woodlands, tillable, impervious surfaces, etc.) can be performed.

The presentation will cover the imagery products derived for the current OSIP Program, the differences from the original program, 8-bit versus 16-bit imagery, 4-band (RGBN) stacked orthos and the benefits of such products when used in a remote sensing environment.


Brian Stevens - Woolpert Inc.
Brian is a project manager with Woolpert Inc. and currently functions as Woolpert's Project Manager for the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program and the City of Columbus Impervious Surface Project. Brian works out of Woolpert's Columbus, Ohio Office.

Jon Downey - Woolpert Inc.
Jon is a group manager with Woolpert Inc. and manages Woolpert's R&D Group located in Dayton, Ohio.

Friday 8:20 am - 8:50 am
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Verifying the accuracy of a non-GIS based CadGeo file
Despite the numerous advances in available mapping technology, many public safety computer-aided-dispatch (CAD) systems still utilize a non-GIS based CadGeo file for determining what fire trucks to send to a particular geographic area. This information is usually stored in a flat-file database with street names and ranges associated with a particular "fire box". Unfortunately there is usually no way to easily visualize the data and verify that it is valid. Using Microsoft Access and available Address Point/Centerline GIS data, Jason will demonstrate various methods that he uses to visually verify the CadGeo file at MECC, a regional dispatch center which serves 6 fire departments and 12 fire stations protecting approximately 130,000 citizens. These methods can be easily applied to various other CadGeo files of similar structure and all software code and examples used will be provided to attendees. See http://www.HelpMeFixMyCad.com for more details.

Jason Miller - Plain Township Fire Department
Jason is an 18 year veteran of the fire service and has been with the Plain Township Fire Department in New Albany for the past 8 years. In addition to being a firefighter/paramedic, Jason is responsible for GIS/mapping and IT support for his department and for MECC, a regional dispatch agency that Plain Towship is a part of. Jason has developed an in-vehicle GIS mapping application that is now used by over 60 fire departments in Ohio. Jason and his wife Kim, have 3 children and reside in Millersburg - Holmes County.

Friday 8:55 am - 9:25 am
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Stream Feature Extraction from OSIP DEMs
This session presents a method to extract stream features from a digital elevation model (DEM). Results from four sub-watersheds, each representing a physiographic region of Ohio, are presented. The method uses the lidar-derived, high-resolution DEM created as part of the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program. The method incorporates USGS-developed DEM processing techniques with the ArcHydro stream and catchment generation workflow, and is partially automated using ESRI’s Model Builder. The spatial accuracy of the resultant stream features is quantitatively compared to that of flowlines from the National Hydrography Dataset.

Matt Fancher - Ohio EPA
Matt is a GIS Specialist at the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency in the Division of Surface Water. Matt's primary job function is the development and maintenance of geospatial data representing the activities of the Division, but also provides analytical and cartographic support to staff. Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource from the Ohio State University.

Friday 8:55 am - 9:25 am
Track 2, Franklin Room B
A SHARPP approach to Mitigation Planning using Google
Ohio EMA recently created a Google Map, internet based web portal that is integral to their strategy for achieving an “Enhanced” Hazard Mitigation Plan status, increasing the amount of federal mitigation funds available to local communities following a disaster. Ohio EMA developed a comprehensive hazard mitigation management system portal called SHARPP – State Hazard Analysis Resource and Planning Portal, for effectively organizing mitigation planning, project information, risk assessment and mitigation actions. SHARPP also tracks important Risk Map measures that relate Areas of Mitigation Interest (AOMI) to Mitigation Action Items to Mitigation Projects in an easy to follow web based workflow. This portal was designed and developed in Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 (ASP.NET) with C# code-behind utilizing the .NET Framework 3.5 and Google Maps. The website was developed utilizing IIS 7.0.

Jonathan  Sorg - Ohio EMA


Jesse  Glascock - Stantec


Friday 8:55 am - 9:25 am
Track 3, Franklin Room C
Zen and the Art of GIS Communication
In order to achieve balance, you have to be aware of your audience. Today’s mapping applications require a different mindset when looking to their design. This concept applies not only to cartography, but also to user interface designs. The new paradigm is to make maps not only accessible, but also understandable to non-GIS people. In today’s world, maps are for the people, not just for the professionals. We will look to Zen concepts in order to explain the mystifying new world of GIS, as it applies to getting your message across, to as many people as possible and in as many different ways as possible.

Damon Leonhard - City of Dublin


Richard Frantz - City of Dublin
Rick has worked at the City of Dublin for 5 years on a variety of projects large and small. He also works very part time with the City of Powell as their City Forester and volunteers with the Friends of Goodale Park in Columbus.

Friday 8:55 am - 9:25 am
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Mobile GIS - Dayton's Storm System Master Plan and ArcPad
The City of Dayton selected EMH&T to complete a critically important second phase of their storm sewer master plan development. A large component of the work involves updating Dayton’s storm system inventory within the City’s GIS to include updated information on the principal drainage structures (manholes and catch basins) and conduits (pipes) in the City’s storm sewer system. This updated information needed to support the development of the following:
• A storm sewer system capacity model that will serve as an analytical tool for use in the project and into the future by the Department of Water.
• A Storm Sewer (System) Master Plan, to include an inventory of significant storm system deficiencies and a list of Storm System Capital Improvement Projects (CIP), summarized and ranked to address these deficiencies.

To accomplish this, it was determined that an extensive field data collection effort would be completed. EMH&T developed ArcGIS/ArcPad field data collection processes that collect physical characteristics and condition aspects of infrastructure elements and integrate them into the City’s existing GIS and Hansen Asset Management System. EMH&T will present the technical details of this approach as well as the findings related to incorporating this detailed down-structure information within the existing GIS.


Derek Mair - EMH&T
Derek is currently the Director of Geospatial Solutions with EMH&T and is a certified GISP. He oversees all public sector and private sector technology implementations including GIS. He is responsible for managing the creation of GIS, Document Management, and Work Order/Asset Management systems for EMH&T's clients.

Friday 9:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Stream Channel Mapping in Southwest Ohio using LiDAR Data
LiDAR data is providing new opportunities for quick and efficient stream channel mapping. In SW Ohio, we studied the validity of using LiDAR data in place of field surveys. In Spring 2007, LiDAR was collected for all Ohio and made publicly available. We extracted stream cross-sections from the derived bare-earth DEM using 3D Analyst in ArcMap 9.3.1. We also conducted field surveys of stream channel geometry. Comparison of field surveys to LiDAR cross-sections indicate a strong correlation in streams that are heavily incised and had little flow in Spring 2007. To assist with future use of LiDAR, we suggest a list of criteria for using the Ohio LiDAR for extracting stream cross-sections. Researchers attempting to use LiDAR for stream cross-sections will benefit from this study. We do conclude that while LiDAR provides a quick understanding of stream channel geometry, it does not eliminate the need for field verification and observations.

Robbyn Abbitt - Miami University


Beth Ellison - Southern Illinois University


Monica Rakovan - Miami University


Friday 9:30 am - 10:00 am
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Geo-spatial Methods for Evaluating Existing FEMA Flood Studies for Improved Stakeholder Coordination
The Coordinated Needs Management Strategy (CNMS) is a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) initiative coinciding with the Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning (Risk MAP) program that provides communities with flood information and tools they can use to enhance their flood risk awareness, mitigation plans and better protect their citizens. Through more accurate flood maps, risk assessment tools, and outreach support, CNMS and Risk MAP builds on Map Modernization and strengthens local ability to make informed decisions about reducing risk.
This presentation will showcase GIS as the backbone of the CNMS process. It will focus on the CNMS database model, how the data was developed, tools used to automate a number of the checks, and the coordination between multiple agencies both at the National, State, and local levels to ensure a standard product nationwide. We will also explore how CNMS data, coupled with risk and topography datasets will be used by Federal, State and local planners to prioritize funding toward areas identified with the highest needs.

Tim Beck - Ohio Department of Natural Resources
Tim Beck, CFM, Geographic Information Management Specialist for the Ohio Dept. of Natural Resources, Division of Soil & Water Resources. Tim received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Geography from The Ohio State University. Activities include managing the GIS data for the ODNR Floodplain Management Program and Information Technology specialist for the DSWR. Tim has been active with FEMA’s Risk MAP, Map Modernization, and CNMS projects within Ohio.

James Laine - Stantec Consulting
James Laine is a Project Manager with the Columbus, Ohio office of Stantec Consulting and the Strategic Alliance for Risk Reduction (STARR). James received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Geography from The Ohio State University. James’ professional experience has focused on applying GIS to a variety of natural resource projects. Over the past seven years, James has been active in FEMA’s Map Modernization and Risk Map efforts in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Iowa and Missouri, focusing on floodplain mapping, DFIRM production and outreach.

Friday 10:20 am - 10:50 am
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Use of the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program's LIDAR data in the development of a flood-warning system
LIDAR data from the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program (OSIP) were used to create accurate elevation datasets that ultimately were used to supplement surveyed topography data in a hydraulic model. The hydraulic model was used to determine flood-inundation boundaries, which are one component of a flood-warning system that is being developed by the U. S. Geological Survey and its cooperating partners for central and south-central Licking County. This presentation will describe the process of manipulating the OSIP LIDAR data using a commercial LIDAR software extension for ArcGIS called LP360. Topics that will be covered include classification of LIDAR data, creation and use of breaklines, and the development of new contour maps.

Stephanie Kula - US Geological Survey
Stephanie Kula has been using GIS in her work at the USGS Ohio Water Science Center for over 10 years. Ms. Kula has a BA in Geography, MS in Natural Resources, and MEd in Science Education.

Friday 10:20 am - 10:50 am
Track 3, Franklin Room C
The Future of GIS Technology
In line with the evolution of data access methods that is occurring in other information fields, the process of presenting and querying spatial information is transitioning away from bulky desktop packages and custom-built maps to a distributed thin-client model. Many non-professional GIS end-users will find themselves working with spatial data on a much more in-depth level via Web pages and lightweight mobile “apps” which provide a dynamic and customizable view of the data. Also, with these new portals they are no longer limited to consuming data; they can produce it in large quantities as well. This may signal a transition in the duties of a GIS professional from the old job of fulfilling one-off map requests, to a renewed focus on collecting, mining, and analyzing data, and the new responsibility of maintaining the centralized data services and managing a single digital map used by many people.

This presentation will discuss modern and upcoming technology that will be used to enable this new future for GIS, from a practical standpoint. Instead of hearing about broad topics such as on-demand cloud resources, Web mapping clients, and mobile devices from a high level, you will be shown what specific tools are out there and ways that you can begin to use these new technologies today. Also on the agenda will be a survey of the some of the recent gadgets that are available for enhanced data collection, and their practical implications (i.e., how to justify new toys).

Jon Woyame - USGEO
Jon has been writing software for the Web and mobile devices for the last 10 years. He is still in the recovery stage as a graduate from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department of the University of Toledo. Most recently, under the employment of the Ohio Department of Transportation, he built an asset collection and maintenance platform which consists of a mobile GPS application for performing inventories and inspections of highway assets in the field and a Web portal for viewing, editing, and collecting asset information from either an overhead map or a road-level video perspective. He now independently develops software for the GIS field.

Friday 10:55 am - 11:25 am
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Establishing an Electric Distribution GIS Using ArcFM
The City of Columbus’ electric utility data is currently maintained in a series of schematic AutoCAD drawings, an Access field inventory database, and hand drawn sketches. To create a seamless GIS for the City’s electric distribution system, Stantec is utilizing ESRI’s ArcGIS 9.3 software in conjunction with Telvent Miner & Miner’s ArcFM and Conduit Manager products to develop a comprehensive solution that will allow for improved facilities management as well as electric tracing/analysis. With the completion of this project, the City will be able to quickly identify the specific location and attributes of primary underground and overhead conductors and devices in the event of an outage, maintenance, or upgrades. Since the data model utilizes a geometric network, users can easily trace circuit flow by phase upstream/downstream, and additional ArcFM functionality allows users to determine which features are energized based upon the current open/closed status of switches, fuses, and other devices.

Melissa Williams - Stantec


Friday 10:55 am - 11:25 am
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Exotic and Invasive Pest Analysis and Issue Characterization: City of Evanston, Village of Skokie, Village of Wilmette, Willage of Winnetka, Illinois
The extent and potential impacts of exotic and invasive pests on the combined urban forests of Evanston, Skokie, Wilmette, and Winnetka were evaluated utilizing selected management tools including tree ordinances, management plans, tree inventories, hyperspectral imagery, i-Tree Streets Benefit Model, and urban tree canopy analysis. Hyperspectral imagery and urban tree canopy analysis provided a high-resolution, custom aerial to locate and map individual canopy of selected tree species over 27 square miles. Information was then compiled to assess the impact of invasive pests, such as the loss of annual community and environmental benefits, totaling over $3.5M. Data analysis also indicated that approximately 20,328 street trees could require removal, at a cost of over $11.1M. i-Tree Streets modeling provided quantifiable value to the community regarding energy conservation, air quality, carbon sequestration, stormwater management, and increased property values. An Issue Characterization Report provided an evaluation of the potential impacts and demonstrated the advantages and limitations, and the deliverables and costs associated with utilizing these tools to manage exotic and invasive pests.

Deborah Sheeler - Davey Resource Group
Deborah is a Geographic Information Systems Analyst and Cartographer with 15 years of experience applying GIS technology to environmental analysis. Ms. Sheeler currently supervises GIS operations at Davey and has been with the company for over 13 years. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Geography from Kent State University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Geography from Central Missouri State University with a minor in Earth Science.

Friday 10:55 am - 11:25 am
Track 3, Franklin Room C
Recap of Survey Summit 2011
Discussion on the ACSM Conference, Survey Summit and ESRI User Conference San Diego, CA July 7-12 and 11-15

The American Congress on Surveying and Mapping held its annual conference in conjunction with ESRI's User Conference for the first time this year.
According to ACSM's web site, "ACSM is a part of a broader community of organizations representing the varied interests of practitioners in what has come to be regarded as the 'Geospatial Community'". Member Organizations
(MO's) include the Geographic and Land Information Society (GLIS), American Association of Geodetic Surveying (AAGS), and National Society of Professional Surveyors (NSPS). Each MO gets one vote in the Congress.

The 50 NSPS Governors to the National Society of Professional Surveyors voted to submit notice to withdraw from ACSM in the Spring of 2010, initiating a two-year withdrawal process. At San Diego a vote was passed, but not unanimously, to abolish ACSM and have all its assets and liabilities assumed by NSPS.

This year the Professional Land Surveyors of Ohio (PLSO) sent two representatives to the Survey Summit, namely Robert Akins, NSPS Governor for PLSO and Don Pickenpaugh, PS, GISP, Belmont County GIS Director, and PLSO President for 2011. Also attending was Jeffery Mallison, PS, GISP, GIS Director for Summit County. Don attended a number of ACSM business meetings, filling in for PLSO Executive Director Melinda Gilpin. Don, Jeff and Melinda will discuss surveying and GIS trends.

Don Pickenpaugh - Belmont County
Don has been GIS Director for Belmont County for 10 years, and has attended Ohio GIS Conferences for 20 years. He is 2011 President of the Professional Land Surveyors of Ohio and Secretary of the newly formed Appalachian Ohio Geospatial Data Partnership. He obtained his PS in 1985 while working in the surface mining industry from 1974 to 1988, and his GISP in 2009 while working for the Belmont County Engineer from 1988 to the present. Don is a member of URISA and GLIS and attends OMEGA and Belomar meetings. He holds a BS in Botany from OSU and an AAS in Civil Engineering Technologies from Belmont Technical College.

Melinda Gilpin - PLSO
Melinda Gilpin is the Executive Director of the Professional Land Surveyors of Ohio, Inc., the statewide association for Ohio’s licensed land surveyors. Since joining the organization in 2009, Ms. Gilpin has directed the implementation of a new website, redesigned the organizational newsletter, restructured PLSO’s legislative program and streamlined office operations. Ms. Gilpin has served in non-profit management roles for over 20 years, and holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from Bowling Green State University.

Jeffery Mallison - Summit County
Jeff is presently GIS Director for the Summit County Fiscal Office. Jeff obtained his PS in 1985, his GISP in 2005 and his CMS in 2011. He has a BS in Surveying and Mapping from the University of Akron and has taught GIS classes there. Jeff is a member of PLSO and IAAO. He has worked in surveying in the private and public sector and has worked in GIS for 17 years.

Friday 10:55 am - 11:25 am
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Using GIS to help prioritize water main replacement/rehabilitation
The Columbus Department of Public Utilities stewards over 2500 miles of public water mains for the citizens of Columbus. As part of DPU’s master planning efforts for our water distribution system we’ve developed a risk-based model (risk = likelihood x consequence), using GIS, to help prioritize water main replacements and rehabilitation. Forty years of break data (over 20,000 individual repair records) has been entered into GIS. Water distribution mains were grouped into 18 different classes based on material, diameter, and age. By evaluating the break history for each pipe class it was possible to develop failure curves to allow us to predict the likelihood of failure. Consequence of failure was estimated based on the pipe diameter, the proximity to different classes of roadways/railroads, proximity to large users or critical customers, and proximity to water bodies. Linkage to DPU’s hydraulic model also allowed deficiencies in capacity to be factored into the prioritization scheme.

The presentation will discuss the process of developing the risk based model using GIS. We will also discuss limitations/challenges with the model, some due to limitations in the GIS, others with the methodology. We will discuss ideas for future refinement to the model using improved data sets (e.g. LBRS centerline). Finally, we will discuss how we plan on using the results of the risk prioritization model to make decisions on which projects move forward.


George Meyers - City of Columbus, Department of Public Utilities
George Meyers is an engineer in the Asset Management Office (AMO) for the City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities (DPU). The AMO is responsible for strategic planning for how to manage the City’s utility infrastructure. The AMO and DPU strive to provide the levels of service customers want, at acceptable levels of risk, for the lowest lifecycle cost. Prior to joining DPU in 2007 Mr. Meyers worked in risk management for 8 years as the Floodplain Engineer for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water, Floodplain Management Program. Prior to that, he worked as a civil engineer for 6 years in retail and commercial site design. His current position with the AMO draws well upon both of these past experiences. He received a BS in Civil Engineering from Ohio State in 1993 and is a registered professional engineer in the State of Ohio.

Kevin Campanella - City of Columbus Department of Public Utilities
Kevin is a professional engineer with 17 years of experience in wastewater engineering, master planning, and utility management. He spent time in New Zealand specializing in asset management, and from 2003-2008, he specialized in asset management implementation as a consultant for the Columbus Division of Sewerage and Drainage. Since March 2008, he has served as an Assistant Director of Public Utilities, in the role of their Enterprise Asset Manager.

Friday 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Track 1, Franklin Room A
The Lake Erie Coastal Erosion Areas GIS of Ohio
Coastal erosion along the Lake Erie coastline of Ohio is a major geologic hazard for landowners who live along the lake shore; many properties, buildings, and infrastructure are lost to coastal erosion. The State of Ohio maps and delineates the coastal erosion areas (CEA) of the state every ten years, identifying areas at risk of being lost to coastal erosion during the following thirty years. Through the CEA program, owners of at-risk properties are provided information on how to protect their properties from coastal erosion.

Remapping of coastal erosion areas involved converting previous coastal erosion area maps and data to a GIS, mapping the 2004 shoreline, and updating older shore erosion software to a newer software language. The original CEA shorelines from 1973 and 1990 were mapped onto 1990 Mylar aerial-photo prints. The Mylar photos were scanned and georeferenced; the 1973 and 1990 shorelines were digitized and converted to a GIS. The 2004 shoreline was mapped using new aerial imagery specifically flown for the project. A number of GIS applications were created to assist with the GIS conversion. In addition, a new application was written to assist novice GIS users with mapping the 2004 shoreline. Finally, the original software that calculated the coastal erosion areas was translated to VBA and ArcObjects for ArcGIS. All of these data and applications have facilitated the task of remapping the coastal erosion areas along the Lake Erie coastline of Ohio.


James McDonald - ODNR-Geological Survey
Jim McDonald is a GIS Specialist and Geologist with the ODNR-Division of Geological Survey. He has been a project manager on a number of different projects, which include the Lake Erie Coastal Erosion Area GIS, the creation of the original land subdivisions of Ohio GIS, and the mapping of abandoned underground mines. Jim McDonald has experience writing mapping application software, in particular programming with ESRI ArcObjects in Visual Basic.

Friday 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Track 2, Franklin Room B
UA GIS Students Use FEMA’s HAZUS-Multi Hazard Flood Software For Lessons In Emergency Preparedness
UA Students learn FEMA’s HAZUS software. Developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in conjunction with ESRI’s GIS software, HAZUS is a nationally applicable methodology for estimating potential damage, economic loss, and social impacts from natural disasters due to earthquakes, floods, and hurricanes. University of Akron Students apply the HAZUS-MH Flood Model to a real world scenario in Ohio. Students analyze the data, create a flood potential map, and do a power point presentation of their results. This is a great tool for any urban area near a flood zone to assist in emergency preparedness.

Larry Shubat - The Univ of Akron
Professor Shubat received his Masters Degree in Geodesy at The Ohio State University in 1987, and a second Masters Degree in Geography/GIS in 2005 from The University of Akron. He served 20 years in the US Army in the Mapping, Charting and Geodesy fields. He is currently teaching at The University of Akron in the Surveying and Mapping program, and is the Program Director for the Geographic and Land Information Systems (GIS/LIS) Associate Degree program.

Friday 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Track 3, Franklin Room C
PDF Maps - Past, Present - IS there a future?
In this age of internet applications, Google Earth, ArcGIS this, ArcGIS that, is there a way that I can send a simple map to someone, digitally, that requires no training? Will spawn no endless list of questions and comments? Does not require an internet connection when out in the field? Will work with an iPhone, iPad, Netbooks, Notebooks – will work with practically any computer on Earth? Does not require me, as the service provider, to purchase any more hardware, software, or software extensions?
There is a solution that we have had some success with here in Clinton County, and that is exporting maps out into a Geo-Enabled PDF file. With a free application, it is possible to add map features on top of PDF maps, using the ever-popular iPhones and iPads. We have e-mailed them to users, made them available on web pages, handed them out on portable drives, in multipage book format and on single pages, and even included limited attributes.
While this may not be a solution for the masses, it definitely fills a niche, and I have found Geo-enabled PDF maps both interesting and very useful.


Joe Merritt - Clinton County Engineers Office


Friday 11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Track 4, Franklin Room D
New US Topo Maps Now Online for Ohio, plus Historic USGS Quads
The U.S. Geological Survey now has more than 700 new US Topo maps for most of Ohio. These maps are available online at no charge in GeoPDF format or can be ordered in printed form from USGS for $15. The online US Topo maps are available from the new National Map viewer or the USGS Store website. Current plans call for updating and improving US Topo maps for Ohio every three years. US Topo is the next generation of digital topographic maps from USGS. They are designed to look and feel like traditional paper topographic maps while providing modern technical advantages for manipulation and distribution. USGS is also providing digital versions of earlier edition topographic quadrangle maps. This presentation will provide information on how to find, download, and view US Topo maps.
< http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2009/3108/ >



Cheryl O'Brien - USGS
Cheryl O'Brien is a technical information specialist with the USGS Science Information Services office in Reston, Virginia. Ms. O'Brien has been with USGS for 23 years after working for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. She has participated in the Ohio GIS Conference several times in recent years. She has an educational background in Geography and Urban and Regional Planning.

Friday 1:40 pm - 2:10 pm
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Development of a Geographically Enabled Wind Industry Supply Chain Database
Since July of 2008, the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs has been working with the Great Lakes WIND Network (GLWN) to create an information system in an interactive website to help companies that supply or can potentially supply the wind industry to connect with each other. The School designed and created a database and management system to allow GLWN to add, manage, and discover company profile data. Using a .NET based web entry form and ArcGIS Server, the School created a data visualization tool that allows for real-time updating of an interactive web map. A SQL database of companies’ profile data was joined to an SDE geo database of company locations so that the data can be viewed on the map. Queries can also be performed by selecting an industry type or defining a search radius to select all companies within a distance of a company.

David Simon - Ohio University
Dave Simon is the GIS Manager at the Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs at Ohio University. He has 10 years’ experience with GIS, including database development, management, and web mapping development and management.

Taeil Kim - Ohio University


Friday 1:40 pm - 2:10 pm
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Taking it to the Streets… And Beyond: Mobile Mapping Technology Overview, Applications and Asset Inventory Considerations
Mobile mapping systems are being used for design surveys as well as asset inventories. With the advancement of image/pattern recognition software, we are able to automate the process of feature extraction. Software can be “trained” to recognize various features within a data-rich environment, including many automated attributes, with approximate positions obtained using multiple georeferenced images and further analyzed and positioned through LiDAR data processing software. These processes are done in batch mode, with little operator intervention, and it’s now practical to sift through lots of data to extract virtually any asset of interest in an automatic process. Assets capable of being discerned by onboard sensors can consist of signs, manhole covers, and pavement cracks as well as many others within or adjacent to the right of way.

This presentation will demonstrate how mobile mapping can be utilized for the asset inventory of many transportation and utility corridors. It will also present applications for planners, engineers and GIS professionals, such as asset inventory of signage for the FWHA’s recent regulations on retroreflectivity.

Jack Kuttrus - Woolpert
Mr. Kuttrus manages Woolpert’s geospatial services in the Columbus Ohio office, including Terrestrial laser scanning services, the Mobile Mapping technology and Subsurface Utility Engineering type projects. Jack’s 16 years of experience specializes in projects that involve large engineering design, dimensional control and data acquisition technologies & solutions. His duties include an array of program management services, technical lead assistance for firm-wide initiatives and special application development projects. For the past 8 years he’s been beta testing data documentation techniques utilizing GPS, 3D laser scanners, high resolution camera systems and airborne techniques to develop more efficient, accurate and cost effective solutions involving multiple datasets and multiple technologies to incorporate a fusion of deliverables.

Friday 1:40 pm - 2:10 pm
Track 3, Franklin Room C
What to Expect from FEMA’s New Risk MAP GIS Datasets
Beginning in Fiscal Year 2010, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) initiated the Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning (Risk MAP) program. To support the program, FEMA has introduced a new suite of GIS-based datasets. Attendees will learn about the new Flood Risk Database and how this database and associated products can be used to aid efforts to plan for, respond to, and mitigate flooding emergencies.

Attendees will be introduced to some real-world Risk MAP datasets, based in Ohio. This presentation will explore how the GIS data was developed and how it can be utilized by floodplain managers and other flood mitigation and planning professionals to identify risk. The presentation will detail the role that GIS plays in the Flood Risk project lifecycle, showing how the results from the HAZUS analysis drive parts of the final Risk MAP database, Flood Risk Map, & Flood Risk Report. This demonstration will also showcase how the Risk MAP program can be used to increase public awareness of flood risk and help communities take further action that reduces risk to life and property.


Matthew Lesher, CFM - Ohio Dept. of Natural Resources
Matt Lesher is an Environmental Specialist with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Floodplain Management Program. Matt has a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Biology from Ohio University, a Master of Environmental Sciences from Miami University and is currently working towards a Master of Business Administration from Otterbein University. Currently, Matt coordinates FEMA’s Map Modernization, Risk MAP and CNMS initiatives in Ohio and serves as the Floodplain Management Programs mitigation specialist.

Brad Ziss, GISP - Stantec Consulting
Brad Ziss is a Senior GIS analyst in the Columbus, Ohio office of Stantec Consulting. Brad has a Bachelor of Science in Geography, specializing in GIS, from the Ohio State University. Recently, Brad has been active in FEMA’s Map Modernization and Risk Map efforts throughout the US, including projects in Ohio, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, New Hampshire and Oregon, focusing on floodplain mapping and DFIRM production and Risk MAP.

Friday 1:40 pm - 2:10 pm
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Moving LBRS Data from Shapefile Format to Geodatabase Format
Most county LBRS data has been delivered and currently resides in ESRI shapefile format. With the advent of ESRI Geodatabase format, many Ohio counties are moving or have moved to this new format for the storage of their local county data. Moving LBRS data into geodatabase format is a natural next step for many counties. Storing LBRS data in this format holds many advantages.
The geodatabase offers you the ability to:
• Store a rich collection of spatial data in a centralized location.
• Apply sophisticated rules and relationships to the data.
• Define advanced geospatial relational models (e.g., topologies, networks).
• Maintain integrity of spatial data with a consistent, accurate database.
• Work within a multiuser access and editing environment.
• Integrate spatial data with other IT databases.
• Easily scale your storage solution.
• Support custom features and behavior.
• Leverage your spatial data to its full potential.
The presenter will demonstrate how she has approached the county data conversion and the results achieved. She will also highlight some important next steps for ensuring that standards are created and maintained both within each geodatabase and also between the County and State governments so as to support the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that establishes roles and responsibilities for LBRS program participation.


Leitha Sackmann - Fulton County Auditor's Office
Leitha Sackmann has been working with GIS in Fulton County for 11 years, first with the Regional Planning Dept and then the last 3 ½ years as the County GIS Supervisor under the Auditor’s Dept. She earned her MA in Geography and Planning at the University of Toledo and was awarded an OGRIP Best Practices Award in 2008.

Friday 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Developing the 2011 Redistricting Database for Ohio
The Levin Urban College at Cleveland State University, in collaboration with the Voinovich Center at Ohio University, produced the database of precinct boundaries and census and election results data used for redistricting of Ohio’s congressional and General Assembly districts. The project provided a common and unified database for redistricting - unifying population and election results data and providing all interested parties with a common set of data with which to draw political boundaries.

The final database includes data for census geography – such as census blocks – and voting precincts. Election results data include results from the 2008 and 2010 general elections, and merges these data with population data reported from the 2010 Census. Primary and general elections in 2012 will use the new election district boundaries.


Mark Salling - Cleveland State University
Geographer, Demographer, Urban Researcher Director of the Northern Ohio Data & Information Service (NODIS) in the Urban College at Cleveland State University. Manages a team of researchers, programmers, GIS Specialists, and student employees involved in data dissemination, demographic analysis, and urban and GIS applications. State of Ohio’s Liaison to the Census Bureau for its redistricting data programs. Serves on the Council of the Ohio Geographically Referenced Information Program (OGRIP), representing higher education. Member of the Core Committee of GISCorps which matches GIS professionals to volunteer opportunities in underprivileged communities, particularly in developing countries.

Friday 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm
Track 2, Franklin Room B
LiDAR Puts Stormwater On The Map
Over the years, municipalities have calculated impervious surfaces through manual methods, involving photo interpretation using stereo-imagery or by heads-up digitizing from ortho photography. Both methods are time consuming, costly and labor intensive. To provide a more timely and cost effective approach, the City of Columbus (Department of Public Utilities) initiated a process of delineating impervious surfaces by utilizing ortho-imagery and LiDAR. Fusing the ortho-imagery and LiDAR provides an accurate means of deriving impervious surfaces located through-out the City and enables the City to maintain a more accurate and up-to-date impervious surface layer.

The presentation will cover the existing methods used to delineate impervious surfaces and review the benefits realized from implementing the automated process. Focus will be given to the technology and methodology utilized to automate the delineation of impervious surfaces and how the program has benefitted the City.


Brian Stevens - Woolpert Inc.
Brian is a project manager with Woolpert Inc. and currently functions as Woolpert's Project Manager for the Ohio Statewide Imagery Program and the City of Columbus Impervious Surface Project. Brian works out of Woolpert's Columbus, Ohio Office.

Friday 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm
Track 3, Franklin Room C
The Capacity of Hope: Developing a Regional Build-Out Model with GIS
The Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission (MVRPC) is a forum and resource where regional partners identify priorities, develop public policy and implement collaborative strategies to improve the quality of life and economic vitality throughout the Miami Valley.

In 2007, MVRPC began a Regional Land Use Planning initiative titled “Going Places: An Integrated Land Use Vision for the Miami Valley Region.” This initiative implements scenario planning process to identify land use vision for making the Dayton region more livable and sustainable with a good quality of life.

During the last two years, the Going Places initiative used GIS as a backbone of the scenario planning process - scenario building through civic engagement and evaluation using performance indicators. Further, GIS served as a main framework during the holding capacity analyses using various data such as Census data, regional land use parcel data, and land development suitability data generated from compilation of 30 factors.

The session begins with a brief overview of MVRPC’s use of GIS as a component of its planning support system, followed by a brief overview of the Going Places initiative and the use of GIS during Going Places’ scenario building and evaluation process . The main focus of the session is to share the knowledge and experiences obtained during the implementation stage of the holding capacity analyses and to illustrate how data from variety of sources were integrated.


Martin Kim - MVRPC
Martin Kim is the Director of Regional Planning with over 12 years of experience in strategic planning, transportation planning, land use planning and GIS. Mr. Kim received a B.S. in Urban Planning and a Master of Urban Administration. Martin is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP), a Certified GIS Professional (GISP), and an adjunct professor at Wright State University.

Tom Harner - MVRPC
Tom Harner is a GIS Coordinator with over 20 years of experience in the GIS field. His experiences include enterprise GIS, enterprise database management, and spatial analysis. Mr. Harner received a Bachelor of Geography and is an adjunct professor at Sinclair Community College

Kathryn Youra Polk - MVRPC
Kathryn Youra Polk is a GIS Specialist/Planner with over 3 years of experience in the GIS and planning field. Her experiences include land use planning and GIS with special emphasis on spatial analysis. Ms. Youra Polk received a Bachelor of Art in Communication, Master of Urban Planning and Master of Geographic Information Systems.

Friday 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Managing your Infrastructure Assets using GIS
Government agencies are often tasked with maintaining infrastructure assets, equipment and much more. For example, FHWA mandated that by 2012, all municipalities must implement and continue to use a management method to maintain traffic sign retroreflectivity. Similarly, the EPA requires that operators of MS4 systems implement a stormwater management program to control pollutants discharged into local waterways. Identifying and maintaining these items can be a daunting task, especially with limited budgets and resources.

How can this task be more manageable? This presentation will demonstrate how using a geographic information system (GIS) is the best option for managing infrastructure assets such as traffic signs, guardrails, stormwater outfalls, trees and ADA compliance among others.

During this presentation, participants will learn how GIS can integrate information into one place, how a GIS-based inventory can make maintenance easier, tips for accurate data collection and why customization is key.

In addition, the presentation will show how a web-based infrastructure management system that is GIS-based reduces the initial investment in software and training. The web-based approach eliminates the need for expensive GIS licenses and advanced GIS users. It allows the appropriate staff to manage the information and increases efficiency by eliminating costly and ineffective handoffs.

Kevin Miller - LJB Inc.
Mr. Miller is a principal with LJB who has more than 14 years of experience and specializes in traffic engineering and GIS applications. His traffic engineering expertise includes traffic analysis, operations and signal systems. Mr. Miller has extensive experience with GIS applications, GIS for web-based integration, and asset management projects including sign, guardrail, traffic crash, pavement marking and construction plan inventories. Mr. Miller has a bachelor's degree in civil engineering and a master's degree in business administration. He has dedicated his career to providing innovative solutions to traffic engineering and GIS/asset management problems throughout Ohio.

Friday 3:20 pm - 3:50 pm
Track 1, Franklin Room A
Smart Phones Move the Field Forces Forward
The field services group at DLZ provides a wide range of services for construction projects ranging from material testing to inspections. Processing the data logged by the crew in the field is a major factor that slows down the whole operation. For years DLZ has been investing in cost effective mobile technologies to improve productivity. Starting in 2005, collecting data using a palm pilot has proven to be very successful. As the production of palm pilot was discontinued, DLZ was forced to find a replacement device. That leads to an implementation of an iPhone based data collection system. With low cost data collection App and cloud web hosting services, DLZ developed a few tools using open source software to streamline the new process to move the field forces forward. The switch was an easy sell because by choosing a service oriented software and using open source software, large initial investment were avoided. Data collected using the GPS enabled phones gave the company a new perspective for analyzing the data, understanding the process.

Mel Meng - DLZ
Mel Yuanhang Meng, PE|GISP, works in the field of water/wastewater infrastructure design, maintenance,and modeling. His GIS experiences include asset management, field data collection, and mobile/desktop/web GIS application development. He holds two master’s degrees(GIS,Environmental Engineering).

Barry Wong - DLZ
Mr. Wong has more than 20 years of experience working as a construction and geotechnicial engineer and in the field of materials testing. He is experienced in subsurface explorations, stability analyses, settlement, laboratory testing, geotechnical reports, landfills, landfill lining, roadway pavements, volume computation and field geotechnical observations and evaluations. His responsibilities include laboratory quality control and filed monitoring and testing. As the Field Services and Laboratory Division Manager, Mr. Wong is responsible for overseeing all field and laboratory testing of construction materials.

Gary Bowen - DLZ
Gary Bowen, CCM is the Construction Services Department Manager for DLZ Ohio, Inc. in Columbus. Gary has been managing construction management, inspection and testing at DLZ for 12 years. Currently, he is the Construction Manager for multiple complex public infrastructure improvements for the City of Columbus, The Ohio State University and other public sector clients. His current role includes providing Global Logistics coordination for the Ohio State University, where geospatial technology has been critical to planning, coordination and communication efforts.

Friday 3:20 pm - 3:50 pm
Track 2, Franklin Room B
Balanced Growth Analysis for Central Ohio Watersheds
Balanced Growth Planning remains an emerging concept in Ohio. Five of these “Watershed Protection Plans” piloted the process in the Lake Erie Basin. The Ohio Lake Erie Commission and Ohio Water Resources Council have brought the process statewide with their first round of planning grants.
These plans pick up where the shorter range “Watershed Action Plans” leave off. Helping manage the location of future land use development and conservation can help improve or maintain water quality over the long run.
In central Ohio, five balanced growth plans are underway at the HUC8 sub-watershed level on the Big Walnut, Whetstone and Walnut Creeks, as well as the Olentangy and Upper Scioto Rivers. With over 80 local jurisdictions involved, GIS analysis is critical. These jurisdictions, along with other stakeholders, come together in each sub-watershed to discuss what attributes make important areas to conserve, develop, and keep in agricultural production. Separate political agendas aside, this input then forms the basis for an objective GIS analysis to identify, in “Balanced Growth” lingo, Priority Conservation, Priority Development, and Priority Agricultural Areas.


Annie McCabe - Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission
Annie earned her B.S. and M.A. in Geography from The Ohio State University. She is a GIS Specialist for the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission.

Andy Taylor - Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission
Andy Taylor, AICP is a Planning Coordinator at the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) where he helps scope, coordinate, write, and edit planning projects in the Transportation Department. For the agency, he contributes to land use analysis and community information projects. He holds a Masters in City and Regional Planning from The Ohio State University and is certified through the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP).

Friday 3:20 pm - 3:50 pm
Track 3, Franklin Room C
The Shape of Ohio: A Historical Examination of the Ohio’s Boundaries
The focus of this presentation will be a historical review of how Ohio’s political and administrative boundaries were established. Discussion will focus on the historical events that lead to establishing the statewide boundaries and the evolution of the county boundaries over the past 200 years. There are many interesting characters that helped shape Ohio and their names and legacy are still imprinted on the State. The implications of the boundaries and how they were established play an important role in understanding Ohio’s rich cultural heritage; and the geographic decisions made centuries ago still play an important role in shaping Ohio’s future.

Todd Tucky - Heartland GIS
Todd Tucky GISP – Todd is the senior consultant and owner of Heartland GIS. He has been using GIS technologies for the past 21+ years and has an extensive background in GIS planning and implementation projects. He teaches GIS classes at Columbus State and serves on their GIS program advisory board. As a certified archaeologist and GIS/Information Systems professional, he worked at the Ohio Historical Society for over 15 years and has vested interest in Ohio’s archaeological and historical cultural heritage.

Friday 3:20 pm - 3:50 pm
Track 4, Franklin Room D
Stream Inferencing Test Model for Storm Sewer Infrastructure
Stream inferencing can be used to detect underground storm sewer information as well as inferred and buried streams. This information is related to the development of post WWII infrastructure which mocked the flow and layout of the region. Stream morphology affects the way that these structures are related over time. Natural erosion and plant growth along with modifications to the infrastructure of the area due to new development all have an impact on the water flow patterns. This project will use a GIS model to test how this inferencing can be used to predict these patterns. The project will utilize a two square mile test area along the Big Creek waterway, a tributary of the Cuyahoga River. The test area will be used to develop the inferencing model on a small scale in order to test its applicability in different areas. The model will be built utilizing data from the National Hydrography Dataset for the Cleveland watershed and Digital Elevation Model LIDAR data from Ohio, and watershed delineation for the test area will be conducted using the ArcGIS tool ArcHydro.

Stacy Ineman - Cleveland State University
Recent graduate of Cleveland State University with a Master of Arts in Environment Studies and GIS certification under the guidance of Dr. Sung-Gheel (Gil) Jang. Currently pursuing personal research in the areas of GIS and environmental management. Resides in Cleveland, Ohio.